Weather Alert

Tensions rise in water battle along Oregon-California line

FILE - In this March 2, 2020, file photo, birds take off from a marsh in the Tulelake National Wildlife Refuge in the Klamath Basin along the Oregon-California border. One of the worst droughts in memory in the massive agricultural region straddling the California-Oregon border could mean steep cuts to irrigation water for hundreds of farmers this summer to sustain endangered fish species critical to local tribes. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which oversees water allocations in the federally owned Klamath Project, is expected to announce this week how the season's water will be divvied up after delaying the decision a month. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)

By GILLIAN FLACCUS Associated Press
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A historic drought in a massive agricultural region straddling Northern California and southern Oregon could mean steep cuts to the water provided to hundreds of farmers to sustain endangered fish species. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation oversees water allocations in the Klamath Project. It’s expected to announce this week how much water farmers will get this season, if any, after delaying the decision a month amid severe drought. The Klamath and Yurok tribes have treaties guaranteeing the protection of their fisheries. They want water for federally listed fish species, the sucker fish and coho salmon.

 


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